what size is a 33 inch tire

What Size Is A 33 Inch Tire


 | 

Time To Read:

10 minutes

 | 

Time To Read:

10 minutes

Ever looked at the numbers and letters on your tire and felt like you’re trying to crack an enigma code? Ever wondered why tire sizes are so complex and how to find out the size you need? Well, you’re not alone.

Decoding tire sizes can feel like an advanced math class, but it’s a lot simpler than you might think.

What Size Is A 33 Inch Tire

A 33-inch tire isn’t a specific size in terms of metric tire measurements, but rather, it refers to the overall diameter of the tire. Multiple tire sizes like 285/75R16, 285/70R17, or 295/55R20 can equate to a 33-inch diameter depending on the width and aspect ratio of the tire.

In this article, we’ll demystify tire sizes, helping you decode those cryptic numbers on your tire sidewalls. We’ll dive into understanding aspect ratios, explain common tire size conversions for a 33-inch diameter, and guide you through using a tire size calculator specifically designed to help you find the right tire by overall height.

Let’s take a closer look.

Calculator To Find Metric Tire Sizes By Height

The tire size calculator is a fantastic resource to help you narrow down your options. It gives you a ballpark idea of what sizes could add up to the overall tire height you want, on the size rim you plan to use.

The calculator isn’t meant to give you a definitive answer, but rather to help guide your search and make your tire shopping experience a bit easier. It’s like having a compass in the wild—it won’t tell you exactly where to go, but it’ll help you figure out the right direction.

How to Use the Calculator

Using the tire size calculator is easy. Here’s a step-by-step guide:

  1. Enter Tire Diameter: Start by entering the tire diameter you want (in inches) into the appropriate box. If you’re aiming for a 33 inch tire, you’d input ’33’.
  2. Enter Wheel Size: Next, input your wheel size (in inches). This is the diameter of the wheel that your tire is going to be mounted on. For example, if you have a 16 inch wheel, you’d input ’16’.
  3. Adjust Section Width: Now you’ll see a slider for section width. This is the width of the tire in millimeters. Slide this until you find the section width you want.
  4. Get the Result: Once you’ve input all these details, the calculator will generate the aspect ratio that, together with the section width and wheel size you’ve entered, gives you a tire with the overall diameter you want.

A Note About the Tire Size Calculator

Firstly, the calculator can spit out tire sizes that aren’t manufactured. This usually happens if you input unrealistic tire heights or wheel sizes. Remember, the calculator does the math based on the numbers you put in, but it can’t know whether those numbers make sense for real-world tires.

Also, the calculator might not always be 100% accurate. Tire sizes can vary a little between different manufacturers and even different tire models from the same manufacturer. For instance, one company’s 285/75R16 might not have the exact same dimensions as another’s.

Wheel Width Tire Size Calculator

Once your determine what size tire you need you’ll need to make sure it’ll fit on your wheel. A 17″ wheel, for instance, is available in different widths. A narrow wheel is best for narrower tires and obviously wider wheels work best for wide tires.

This calculator allows you to easily determine the optimal tire width for your wheel width. You can usually find the width of your current wheels etched or molded onto the back side of the wheel somewhere.

Understanding Tire Sizes

Let’s say you’re looking at a tire and see something like “285/75R16” printed on the side. That’s the size of your tire. Each part of that code tells you something about the tire’s size and type. 

tire size 3 main numbers example
Tire Size – 3 Main Numbers Example

Let’s break it down to see what each number means.

The Metric Tire Size

Metric tire size is broken down into three parts: section width, aspect ratio, and wheel diameter.

  • Section Width – The first number (e.g., 285 in our example) is the section width. This is the width of the tire from one side to the other when it’s not on the vehicle, measured in millimeters. So, a 285 tire is 285 millimeters wide.
  • Aspect Ratio – The second number (75 in our example) is the aspect ratio. This isn’t a straight-up measurement, like the section width. It’s a percentage that tells you how tall the tire’s sidewall is compared to its width. So if our tire has an aspect ratio of 75, that means the height of the tire’s sidewall is 75% of the tire’s width.
  • Wheel Diameter – The last number (16 in our example) is the wheel diameter. This is the size of the wheel that the tire fits on, measured in inches. So, a tire that says R16 is designed to fit on a 16-inch wheel.

Diameter in Inches

Sometimes, you’ll see tire sizes given in inches instead of metric measurements. This is common for truck and off-road vehicle tires. If a tire has a “33” in its size, that’s its diameter in inches. So, a 33-inch tire is roughly the same diameter as a 285/75R16 tire.

But remember, just because two tires have the same diameter doesn’t mean they’re the same size. Other factors like section width and aspect ratio can make two tires with the same diameter very different in actual size.

How To Read Tire Sizes On Sidewalls

Most tires will have a code that looks something like this: “P285/75R16 114S”. Let’s break down what each part of that code means.

how to read tire size
Tire Size Sidewall Illustration
  • Type of Vehicle – The letter at the very start of the code tells you what type of vehicle the tire is meant for. In our example, ‘P’ stands for passenger vehicle. You might also see ‘LT’ for light trucks, ‘T’ for temporary spare, and so on.
  • Section Width – Just like we learned earlier, the first number (285 in our example) is the section width. This number is giving us the width of the tire in millimeters.
  • Aspect Ratio – The second number (75 here) is the aspect ratio. This tells us that the height of the sidewall is 75% of the section width.
  • Construction – The letter that follows the aspect ratio tells us about the tire’s construction. The ‘R’ in our example means the tire is a radial tire, which is the most common type of tire today.
  • Wheel Diameter – Next up is the wheel diameter (16 in this case). This tells us the size of the wheel that the tire is designed to fit, in inches.
  • Load Index – The next number (114 here) is the load index. This number represents the maximum weight that the tire can safely carry when fully inflated.
  • Speed Rating – The last letter in our example (‘S’) is the speed rating. This letter tells us the maximum speed at which the tire can carry a load corresponding to its load index.

Understanding Aspect Ratio

Now that we’ve mastered how to read tire sizes and what they mean, let’s dive a little deeper into one of the key parts of the tire size: the aspect ratio. This little number plays a big role in how your tire performs, so it’s worth understanding.

Tire Dimensions Illustration
Tire Dimensions Illustration

Aspect Ratio Defined

First things first, what is the aspect ratio? In simple terms, the aspect ratio is a percentage that tells you how tall the tire’s sidewall is compared to its width. It’s represented by the second number in the tire size. For example, in a tire size of 285/75R16, the 75 is the aspect ratio. This means the height of the sidewall is 75% of the width of the tire.

The Role of Aspect Ratio

You might be wondering, why does the aspect ratio matter? Well, it can have a big impact on your driving experience.

  • Driving Comfort: Tires with a higher aspect ratio (meaning taller sidewalls relative to their width) tend to provide a more comfortable, smoother ride. That’s because the extra height in the sidewall allows it to absorb more shock from bumps and potholes.
  • Handling: On the flip side, tires with a lower aspect ratio (shorter sidewalls) typically provide better handling and cornering ability. That’s because there’s less sidewall to flex when you’re turning, which can make the vehicle more responsive.

Choosing the Right Aspect Ratio

Choosing the right aspect ratio really depends on what you’re looking for in your driving experience.

  • If comfort is your top priority, you might want to look for a tire with a higher aspect ratio.
  • If you want your vehicle to have sharp handling and responsiveness, a lower aspect ratio might be the way to go.

Keep in mind that the right aspect ratio can also depend on your vehicle. Some vehicles are designed to work best with a certain range of aspect ratios. Always check your vehicle’s manual or consult with a tire professional to make sure you’re getting the right tires for your vehicle.

off road tires
Off-Roading Ground Clearance

Common Tire Size Conversions for a 33 Inch Diameter

Okay, so now you’re a whiz at reading tire sizes and understanding aspect ratios. But, how does this all fit into the question of figuring out the metric tire size that equals a 33 inch overall diameter? Let’s untangle this thread together.

Conversion Basics

Here’s the deal: a tire’s overall diameter is just the height of the tire from the ground to the top of the tread. Sounds simple, right? But when we talk about a 33 inch tire, we’re usually talking about its overall diameter.

While the tire’s diameter can be measured directly in inches, metric tire sizes (like 285/75R16) give you the width, aspect ratio, and wheel size – but not the overall diameter. So to figure out the metric size equivalent to a 33 inch diameter, you need to do a bit of math.

Examples of 33 Inch Tire Conversions

But don’t worry, we’ve done the number crunching for you for a few common tire sizes:

  • 285/75R16: This tire size has an overall diameter very close to 33 inches. Here, 285 mm is the section width, 75 is the aspect ratio, and 16 inches is the wheel diameter.
  • 285/70R17: This is another metric tire size that is approximately 33 inches in diameter. In this case, the tire fits a 17 inch wheel.
  • 295/55R20: This tire size also has an overall diameter of around 33 inches and fits on a 20 inch wheel.

Common Questions Answered

To answer some commonly searched questions:

  • Are 33 inch tires the same as 285? Not exactly. A 33 inch tire refers to the overall diameter, while 285 is the section width in millimeters of the tire. A 285/75R16 or a 285/70R17 tire would both be approximately 33 inches in diameter.
  • What size is a 33 inch tire on a 20 inch rim? A 295/55R20 tire would be approximately 33 inches in diameter and would fit on a 20 inch rim.
  • What size is a 33 inch tire on an 18 inch wheel? A 285/60R18 tire would be approximately 33 inches in diameter and would fit on an 18 inch wheel.

Understanding these conversions can help when you’re shopping for new tires, especially if you’re switching between different types of tires or looking to change your tire size.

Resources

Below are some links you may find helpful when learning about tires

Final Thoughts

You’ve cracked the code, and tire sizes no longer need to be a mind-boggling enigma. You’re equipped with the knowledge to read tire sizes, understand aspect ratios, and even calculate your own tire sizes.

The key takeaway? Well, that’s simple. Tires aren’t just round and rubber—they’re sophisticated pieces of engineering with sizes and dimensions that matter a lot. Whether it’s a 33-inch diameter tire or another size, the details can impact your driving experience in a big way.

Good luck and happy motoring.

About The Author

Ever looked at the numbers and letters on your tire and felt like you’re trying to crack an enigma code? Ever wondered why tire sizes are so complex and how to find out the size you need? Well, you’re not alone.

Decoding tire sizes can feel like an advanced math class, but it’s a lot simpler than you might think.

What Size Is A 33 Inch Tire

A 33-inch tire isn’t a specific size in terms of metric tire measurements, but rather, it refers to the overall diameter of the tire. Multiple tire sizes like 285/75R16, 285/70R17, or 295/55R20 can equate to a 33-inch diameter depending on the width and aspect ratio of the tire.

In this article, we’ll demystify tire sizes, helping you decode those cryptic numbers on your tire sidewalls. We’ll dive into understanding aspect ratios, explain common tire size conversions for a 33-inch diameter, and guide you through using a tire size calculator specifically designed to help you find the right tire by overall height.

Let’s take a closer look.

Calculator To Find Metric Tire Sizes By Height

The tire size calculator is a fantastic resource to help you narrow down your options. It gives you a ballpark idea of what sizes could add up to the overall tire height you want, on the size rim you plan to use.

The calculator isn’t meant to give you a definitive answer, but rather to help guide your search and make your tire shopping experience a bit easier. It’s like having a compass in the wild—it won’t tell you exactly where to go, but it’ll help you figure out the right direction.

How to Use the Calculator

Using the tire size calculator is easy. Here’s a step-by-step guide:

  1. Enter Tire Diameter: Start by entering the tire diameter you want (in inches) into the appropriate box. If you’re aiming for a 33 inch tire, you’d input ’33’.
  2. Enter Wheel Size: Next, input your wheel size (in inches). This is the diameter of the wheel that your tire is going to be mounted on. For example, if you have a 16 inch wheel, you’d input ’16’.
  3. Adjust Section Width: Now you’ll see a slider for section width. This is the width of the tire in millimeters. Slide this until you find the section width you want.
  4. Get the Result: Once you’ve input all these details, the calculator will generate the aspect ratio that, together with the section width and wheel size you’ve entered, gives you a tire with the overall diameter you want.

A Note About the Tire Size Calculator

Firstly, the calculator can spit out tire sizes that aren’t manufactured. This usually happens if you input unrealistic tire heights or wheel sizes. Remember, the calculator does the math based on the numbers you put in, but it can’t know whether those numbers make sense for real-world tires.

Also, the calculator might not always be 100% accurate. Tire sizes can vary a little between different manufacturers and even different tire models from the same manufacturer. For instance, one company’s 285/75R16 might not have the exact same dimensions as another’s.

Wheel Width Tire Size Calculator

Once your determine what size tire you need you’ll need to make sure it’ll fit on your wheel. A 17″ wheel, for instance, is available in different widths. A narrow wheel is best for narrower tires and obviously wider wheels work best for wide tires.

This calculator allows you to easily determine the optimal tire width for your wheel width. You can usually find the width of your current wheels etched or molded onto the back side of the wheel somewhere.

Understanding Tire Sizes

Let’s say you’re looking at a tire and see something like “285/75R16” printed on the side. That’s the size of your tire. Each part of that code tells you something about the tire’s size and type. 

tire size 3 main numbers example
Tire Size – 3 Main Numbers Example

Let’s break it down to see what each number means.

The Metric Tire Size

Metric tire size is broken down into three parts: section width, aspect ratio, and wheel diameter.

  • Section Width – The first number (e.g., 285 in our example) is the section width. This is the width of the tire from one side to the other when it’s not on the vehicle, measured in millimeters. So, a 285 tire is 285 millimeters wide.
  • Aspect Ratio – The second number (75 in our example) is the aspect ratio. This isn’t a straight-up measurement, like the section width. It’s a percentage that tells you how tall the tire’s sidewall is compared to its width. So if our tire has an aspect ratio of 75, that means the height of the tire’s sidewall is 75% of the tire’s width.
  • Wheel Diameter – The last number (16 in our example) is the wheel diameter. This is the size of the wheel that the tire fits on, measured in inches. So, a tire that says R16 is designed to fit on a 16-inch wheel.

Diameter in Inches

Sometimes, you’ll see tire sizes given in inches instead of metric measurements. This is common for truck and off-road vehicle tires. If a tire has a “33” in its size, that’s its diameter in inches. So, a 33-inch tire is roughly the same diameter as a 285/75R16 tire.

But remember, just because two tires have the same diameter doesn’t mean they’re the same size. Other factors like section width and aspect ratio can make two tires with the same diameter very different in actual size.

How To Read Tire Sizes On Sidewalls

Most tires will have a code that looks something like this: “P285/75R16 114S”. Let’s break down what each part of that code means.

how to read tire size
Tire Size Sidewall Illustration
  • Type of Vehicle – The letter at the very start of the code tells you what type of vehicle the tire is meant for. In our example, ‘P’ stands for passenger vehicle. You might also see ‘LT’ for light trucks, ‘T’ for temporary spare, and so on.
  • Section Width – Just like we learned earlier, the first number (285 in our example) is the section width. This number is giving us the width of the tire in millimeters.
  • Aspect Ratio – The second number (75 here) is the aspect ratio. This tells us that the height of the sidewall is 75% of the section width.
  • Construction – The letter that follows the aspect ratio tells us about the tire’s construction. The ‘R’ in our example means the tire is a radial tire, which is the most common type of tire today.
  • Wheel Diameter – Next up is the wheel diameter (16 in this case). This tells us the size of the wheel that the tire is designed to fit, in inches.
  • Load Index – The next number (114 here) is the load index. This number represents the maximum weight that the tire can safely carry when fully inflated.
  • Speed Rating – The last letter in our example (‘S’) is the speed rating. This letter tells us the maximum speed at which the tire can carry a load corresponding to its load index.

Understanding Aspect Ratio

Now that we’ve mastered how to read tire sizes and what they mean, let’s dive a little deeper into one of the key parts of the tire size: the aspect ratio. This little number plays a big role in how your tire performs, so it’s worth understanding.

Tire Dimensions Illustration
Tire Dimensions Illustration

Aspect Ratio Defined

First things first, what is the aspect ratio? In simple terms, the aspect ratio is a percentage that tells you how tall the tire’s sidewall is compared to its width. It’s represented by the second number in the tire size. For example, in a tire size of 285/75R16, the 75 is the aspect ratio. This means the height of the sidewall is 75% of the width of the tire.

The Role of Aspect Ratio

You might be wondering, why does the aspect ratio matter? Well, it can have a big impact on your driving experience.

  • Driving Comfort: Tires with a higher aspect ratio (meaning taller sidewalls relative to their width) tend to provide a more comfortable, smoother ride. That’s because the extra height in the sidewall allows it to absorb more shock from bumps and potholes.
  • Handling: On the flip side, tires with a lower aspect ratio (shorter sidewalls) typically provide better handling and cornering ability. That’s because there’s less sidewall to flex when you’re turning, which can make the vehicle more responsive.

Choosing the Right Aspect Ratio

Choosing the right aspect ratio really depends on what you’re looking for in your driving experience.

  • If comfort is your top priority, you might want to look for a tire with a higher aspect ratio.
  • If you want your vehicle to have sharp handling and responsiveness, a lower aspect ratio might be the way to go.

Keep in mind that the right aspect ratio can also depend on your vehicle. Some vehicles are designed to work best with a certain range of aspect ratios. Always check your vehicle’s manual or consult with a tire professional to make sure you’re getting the right tires for your vehicle.

off road tires
Off-Roading Ground Clearance

Common Tire Size Conversions for a 33 Inch Diameter

Okay, so now you’re a whiz at reading tire sizes and understanding aspect ratios. But, how does this all fit into the question of figuring out the metric tire size that equals a 33 inch overall diameter? Let’s untangle this thread together.

Conversion Basics

Here’s the deal: a tire’s overall diameter is just the height of the tire from the ground to the top of the tread. Sounds simple, right? But when we talk about a 33 inch tire, we’re usually talking about its overall diameter.

While the tire’s diameter can be measured directly in inches, metric tire sizes (like 285/75R16) give you the width, aspect ratio, and wheel size – but not the overall diameter. So to figure out the metric size equivalent to a 33 inch diameter, you need to do a bit of math.

Examples of 33 Inch Tire Conversions

But don’t worry, we’ve done the number crunching for you for a few common tire sizes:

  • 285/75R16: This tire size has an overall diameter very close to 33 inches. Here, 285 mm is the section width, 75 is the aspect ratio, and 16 inches is the wheel diameter.
  • 285/70R17: This is another metric tire size that is approximately 33 inches in diameter. In this case, the tire fits a 17 inch wheel.
  • 295/55R20: This tire size also has an overall diameter of around 33 inches and fits on a 20 inch wheel.

Common Questions Answered

To answer some commonly searched questions:

  • Are 33 inch tires the same as 285? Not exactly. A 33 inch tire refers to the overall diameter, while 285 is the section width in millimeters of the tire. A 285/75R16 or a 285/70R17 tire would both be approximately 33 inches in diameter.
  • What size is a 33 inch tire on a 20 inch rim? A 295/55R20 tire would be approximately 33 inches in diameter and would fit on a 20 inch rim.
  • What size is a 33 inch tire on an 18 inch wheel? A 285/60R18 tire would be approximately 33 inches in diameter and would fit on an 18 inch wheel.

Understanding these conversions can help when you’re shopping for new tires, especially if you’re switching between different types of tires or looking to change your tire size.

Resources

Below are some links you may find helpful when learning about tires

Final Thoughts

You’ve cracked the code, and tire sizes no longer need to be a mind-boggling enigma. You’re equipped with the knowledge to read tire sizes, understand aspect ratios, and even calculate your own tire sizes.

The key takeaway? Well, that’s simple. Tires aren’t just round and rubber—they’re sophisticated pieces of engineering with sizes and dimensions that matter a lot. Whether it’s a 33-inch diameter tire or another size, the details can impact your driving experience in a big way.

Good luck and happy motoring.



About The Author