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how to calculate sidewall height

How To Calculate Sidewall Height


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Time To Read:

9 minutes

 | 

Time To Read:

9 minutes

Tires play a crucial role in your vehicle’s performance and safety, but do you know the formula to calculate sidewall height, how tire diameter affects the height, and its importance?

Unlock the secret to understanding tire dimensions and making the best choice for your vehicle’s needs!

How To Calculate Sidewall Height

To calculate sidewall height, first, identify the tire’s aspect ratio and section width from its size marking. Then, multiply the section width (in millimeters) by the aspect ratio (as a decimal) to find the sidewall height (in millimeters).

In this article, we’ll dive into basic tire terminology, explore tire size markings and aspect ratios, compare different tire aspect ratios, measure tire height in inches, and discuss how to use a tire diameter calculator effectively.

Let’s take a closer look.

how to read tire size
Tire Size Sidewall Illustration

Basic Tire Terminology

In this section, we’ll cover some important tire terms that will help you better understand sidewall height. Remember, even though we’re using language that is easy to understand, the information provided is just as valuable for experts as it is for those who are new to the world of tires.

Sidewall Height (Tire Profile or Aspect Ratio)

Sidewall height, also known as tire profile or aspect ratio, is the distance between the wheel’s rim and the outer edge of the tire’s tread. This measurement is important because it affects the overall tire diameter and how it performs on the road. Sidewall height is expressed as a percentage of the tire’s section width, and a higher aspect ratio means the tire has a taller sidewall, while a lower aspect ratio means the tire has a shorter sidewall.

Sidewall Height Calculator

Section Width (Tire Width)

The tire section width, also known as the tire width, refers to the width of a tire when it is inflated and mounted on a wheel. This measurement is taken from the widest point of the outer sidewall to the widest point of the inner sidewall. It’s important to know the section width when selecting the right tire size for your vehicle because it affects the tire’s contact patch (the area of the tire that actually touches the road).

Rim Width

Rim width is the distance between the inner and outer wheel lips of the wheel, where the tire sits. It’s an essential measurement because it determines the width of the tire that can be safely mounted on the wheel. If a tire is too wide or too narrow for the wheel, it may not fit properly or perform as it should.

To sum up, here’s a quick recap of the basic tire terminology we’ve discussed:

  • Sidewall Height (Tire Profile or Aspect Ratio): The distance between the wheel’s rim and the outer edge of the tire’s tread, expressed as a percentage of the tire’s section width.
  • Section Width: The width of a tire when it is inflated and mounted on a wheel, measured from the widest point of the outer sidewall to the widest point of the inner sidewall.
  • Rim Width: The distance between the inner and outer wheel lips of the wheel, where the tire sits.
Tire Size Dimensions
Tire Dimensions Illustration
Wheel Size Dimensions
Rim Diameter & Rim Width Illustration

Tire Size Explained

Tire size markings are a series of numbers and letters printed on the sidewall of a tire. These markings provide essential information about the tire’s size and performance capabilities. Here’s a typical tire size marking example:

P225/60R16 98H

Now let’s break down this tire size marking to understand what each part means:

  • P: This letter stands for “Passenger” and indicates that the tire is designed for passenger vehicles, like cars, minivans, or SUVs. Other possible designations include “LT” for light trucks, “T” for temporary spare tires, and “ST” for special trailer tires.
  • 225: This number represents the section width of the tire in millimeters. In this case, the tire is 225 millimeters wide.
  • 60: This number is the aspect ratio, also known as sidewall height or tire profile. It represents the tire’s height as a percentage of its width. In this example, the sidewall height is 60% of the section width.
  • R: This letter indicates the tire’s construction type. “R” stands for radial, which is the most common type of tire construction. Other less common types include “B” for belted bias and “D” for diagonal bias.
  • 16: This number represents the wheel diameter in inches. The tire in this example is designed to fit on a 16-inch wheel.
  • 98: This number is the tire’s load index, which indicates how much weight the tire can carry when properly inflated. A higher load index means the tire can carry more weight.
  • H: This letter is the tire’s speed rating, which indicates the maximum speed the tire can safely maintain for a sustained period. In this case, “H” represents a maximum speed of 130 mph (210 km/h).

Which Number Represents Sidewall Height (Aspect Ratio)

As mentioned earlier, the number that represents sidewall height or aspect ratio is the one right after the section width and before the construction type. In our example P225/60R16 98H, the number “60” represents the sidewall height or aspect ratio.

Which Number Represents Section Width

The section width is the first number after the tire designation letter. In the example P225/60R16 98H, the number “225” represents the section width in millimeters.

sweet miata
Miata With Nice Fitment

What is Tire Aspect Ratio?

In this section, we’ll explore the concept of tire aspect ratio, how it affects the sidewall height, and its significance in tire performance.

Defining Aspect Ratio

Tire aspect ratio, also known as sidewall height or tire profile, is a comparison between the height of a tire’s sidewall and its section width. The aspect ratio is expressed as a percentage. In other words, it tells us how tall the sidewall is relative to the width of the tire.

For example, let’s consider a tire size marking P225/60R16. The aspect ratio in this case is “60,” meaning the sidewall height is 60% of the section width (225 millimeters).

Significance of Aspect Ratio to Sidewall Height

The aspect ratio plays a significant role in determining the sidewall height. A higher aspect ratio indicates a taller sidewall, which provides a smoother and more comfortable ride. On the other hand, a lower aspect ratio means a shorter sidewall, which usually results in better handling and a sportier feel.

Tire Aspect Ratio Formula

To calculate the sidewall height using the aspect ratio, follow these simple steps:

  1. Identify the section width and aspect ratio from the tire size marking (e.g., P225/60R16 has a section width of 225 millimeters and an aspect ratio of 60).
  2. Convert the aspect ratio to a decimal by dividing it by 100 (e.g., 60 ÷ 100 = 0.6).
  3. Multiply the section width by the decimal aspect ratio to get the sidewall height in millimeters (e.g., 225 mm × 0.6 = 135 mm).

Comparing Different Tire Aspect Ratios

In this section, we’ll examine the differences between various tire aspect ratios and discuss how they affect vehicle performance. We’ll also provide a comparison between Tire Aspect Ratio 60 and 65 as an example.

Explaining the Differences Between Tire Aspect Ratios

Tire aspect ratios can vary significantly, with each offering unique performance characteristics. Here’s a general overview of how different aspect ratios affect tire performance:

  • Higher Aspect Ratios (e.g., 70 or 75): Tires with higher aspect ratios typically have taller sidewalls, providing a smoother and more comfortable ride. These tires are ideal for vehicles used for long drives or cruising, as they offer better shock absorption on rough roads.
  • Moderate Aspect Ratios (e.g., 50 to 60): Tires in this range strike a balance between ride comfort and handling. They offer decent shock absorption while still maintaining a reasonable level of steering responsiveness and road feel.
  • Lower Aspect Ratios (e.g., 30 to 40): Tires with lower aspect ratios have shorter sidewalls, which generally results in improved handling and steering response. However, they tend to have a firmer ride and may be less comfortable on rough roads. These tires are often found on sports cars and high-performance vehicles.

Tire Aspect Ratio 60 vs 65

Now let’s compare two specific aspect ratios, 60 and 65, to illustrate the differences between them:

  • Tire Aspect Ratio 60: Tires with a 60 aspect ratio have sidewalls that are 60% of the section width. These tires provide a good balance between ride comfort and handling, making them suitable for a wide range of vehicles, from sedans to SUVs.
  • Tire Aspect Ratio 65: Tires with a 65 aspect ratio have slightly taller sidewalls (65% of the section width) compared to those with a 60 aspect ratio. The taller sidewalls result in a smoother and more comfortable ride, but may slightly reduce steering responsiveness and handling precision.
Aspect Ratio Illustration
Aspect Ratio Illustration

Measuring Tire Height in Inches

In this section, we’ll learn how to measure tire height (also known as overall diameter) in inches. Knowing the tire height is useful for determining if a particular tire size is suitable for your vehicle and for calculating the overall tire dimensions.

Converting Sidewall Height to Inches

First, let’s convert the sidewall height, which we previously calculated in millimeters, to inches. To do this, simply divide the sidewall height in millimeters by 25.4 (since there are 25.4 millimeters in an inch).

For example, if the sidewall height is 135 millimeters:

Sidewall Height in Inches = 135 mm ÷ 25.4 = 5.31 inches

Calculating Tire Height (Overall Tire Diameter)

Now that we have the sidewall height in inches, we can calculate the overall tire height or diameter. To do this, follow these steps:

  1. Multiply the sidewall height in inches by 2 (since there are two sidewalls, top and bottom).
  2. Add the result to the wheel diameter in inches (from the tire size marking).

For example, let’s consider a tire with a sidewall height of 5.31 inches and a wheel diameter of 16 inches:

Tire Height (Overall Tire Diameter) = (5.31 inches × 2) + 16 inches = 26.62 inches

By following these steps, you can measure the tire height in inches and better understand how a specific tire size will fit and perform on your vehicle.

Tire Diameter Calculator

Resources

Below are some links you may find helpful when learning about tires

Final Thoughts

Understanding tire dimensions, especially sidewall height, is essential to unlock the full potential of your vehicle’s performance and safety. By learning sidewall height, you’ll be better equipped to choose the perfect tire size and improve your vehicle’s driving experience.

Remember this key takeaway: tire diameter significantly influences ride comfort, handling, and aesthetics. As racing legend Mario Andretti once said, “Tires are the most critical part of the car – everything else is just a tune-up.” So, never underestimate the importance of knowing your tire specifications and making informed decisions to ensure optimal performance on the road.

Good luck and happy motoring.

About The Author

Tires play a crucial role in your vehicle’s performance and safety, but do you know the formula to calculate sidewall height, how tire diameter affects the height, and its importance?

Unlock the secret to understanding tire dimensions and making the best choice for your vehicle’s needs!

How To Calculate Sidewall Height

To calculate sidewall height, first, identify the tire’s aspect ratio and section width from its size marking. Then, multiply the section width (in millimeters) by the aspect ratio (as a decimal) to find the sidewall height (in millimeters).

In this article, we’ll dive into basic tire terminology, explore tire size markings and aspect ratios, compare different tire aspect ratios, measure tire height in inches, and discuss how to use a tire diameter calculator effectively.

Let’s take a closer look.

how to read tire size
Tire Size Sidewall Illustration

Basic Tire Terminology

In this section, we’ll cover some important tire terms that will help you better understand sidewall height. Remember, even though we’re using language that is easy to understand, the information provided is just as valuable for experts as it is for those who are new to the world of tires.

Sidewall Height (Tire Profile or Aspect Ratio)

Sidewall height, also known as tire profile or aspect ratio, is the distance between the wheel’s rim and the outer edge of the tire’s tread. This measurement is important because it affects the overall tire diameter and how it performs on the road. Sidewall height is expressed as a percentage of the tire’s section width, and a higher aspect ratio means the tire has a taller sidewall, while a lower aspect ratio means the tire has a shorter sidewall.

Sidewall Height Calculator

Section Width (Tire Width)

The tire section width, also known as the tire width, refers to the width of a tire when it is inflated and mounted on a wheel. This measurement is taken from the widest point of the outer sidewall to the widest point of the inner sidewall. It’s important to know the section width when selecting the right tire size for your vehicle because it affects the tire’s contact patch (the area of the tire that actually touches the road).

Rim Width

Rim width is the distance between the inner and outer wheel lips of the wheel, where the tire sits. It’s an essential measurement because it determines the width of the tire that can be safely mounted on the wheel. If a tire is too wide or too narrow for the wheel, it may not fit properly or perform as it should.

To sum up, here’s a quick recap of the basic tire terminology we’ve discussed:

  • Sidewall Height (Tire Profile or Aspect Ratio): The distance between the wheel’s rim and the outer edge of the tire’s tread, expressed as a percentage of the tire’s section width.
  • Section Width: The width of a tire when it is inflated and mounted on a wheel, measured from the widest point of the outer sidewall to the widest point of the inner sidewall.
  • Rim Width: The distance between the inner and outer wheel lips of the wheel, where the tire sits.
Tire Size Dimensions
Tire Dimensions Illustration
Wheel Size Dimensions
Rim Diameter & Rim Width Illustration

Tire Size Explained

Tire size markings are a series of numbers and letters printed on the sidewall of a tire. These markings provide essential information about the tire’s size and performance capabilities. Here’s a typical tire size marking example:

P225/60R16 98H

Now let’s break down this tire size marking to understand what each part means:

  • P: This letter stands for “Passenger” and indicates that the tire is designed for passenger vehicles, like cars, minivans, or SUVs. Other possible designations include “LT” for light trucks, “T” for temporary spare tires, and “ST” for special trailer tires.
  • 225: This number represents the section width of the tire in millimeters. In this case, the tire is 225 millimeters wide.
  • 60: This number is the aspect ratio, also known as sidewall height or tire profile. It represents the tire’s height as a percentage of its width. In this example, the sidewall height is 60% of the section width.
  • R: This letter indicates the tire’s construction type. “R” stands for radial, which is the most common type of tire construction. Other less common types include “B” for belted bias and “D” for diagonal bias.
  • 16: This number represents the wheel diameter in inches. The tire in this example is designed to fit on a 16-inch wheel.
  • 98: This number is the tire’s load index, which indicates how much weight the tire can carry when properly inflated. A higher load index means the tire can carry more weight.
  • H: This letter is the tire’s speed rating, which indicates the maximum speed the tire can safely maintain for a sustained period. In this case, “H” represents a maximum speed of 130 mph (210 km/h).

Which Number Represents Sidewall Height (Aspect Ratio)

As mentioned earlier, the number that represents sidewall height or aspect ratio is the one right after the section width and before the construction type. In our example P225/60R16 98H, the number “60” represents the sidewall height or aspect ratio.

Which Number Represents Section Width

The section width is the first number after the tire designation letter. In the example P225/60R16 98H, the number “225” represents the section width in millimeters.

sweet miata
Miata With Nice Fitment

What is Tire Aspect Ratio?

In this section, we’ll explore the concept of tire aspect ratio, how it affects the sidewall height, and its significance in tire performance.

Defining Aspect Ratio

Tire aspect ratio, also known as sidewall height or tire profile, is a comparison between the height of a tire’s sidewall and its section width. The aspect ratio is expressed as a percentage. In other words, it tells us how tall the sidewall is relative to the width of the tire.

For example, let’s consider a tire size marking P225/60R16. The aspect ratio in this case is “60,” meaning the sidewall height is 60% of the section width (225 millimeters).

Significance of Aspect Ratio to Sidewall Height

The aspect ratio plays a significant role in determining the sidewall height. A higher aspect ratio indicates a taller sidewall, which provides a smoother and more comfortable ride. On the other hand, a lower aspect ratio means a shorter sidewall, which usually results in better handling and a sportier feel.

Tire Aspect Ratio Formula

To calculate the sidewall height using the aspect ratio, follow these simple steps:

  1. Identify the section width and aspect ratio from the tire size marking (e.g., P225/60R16 has a section width of 225 millimeters and an aspect ratio of 60).
  2. Convert the aspect ratio to a decimal by dividing it by 100 (e.g., 60 ÷ 100 = 0.6).
  3. Multiply the section width by the decimal aspect ratio to get the sidewall height in millimeters (e.g., 225 mm × 0.6 = 135 mm).

Comparing Different Tire Aspect Ratios

In this section, we’ll examine the differences between various tire aspect ratios and discuss how they affect vehicle performance. We’ll also provide a comparison between Tire Aspect Ratio 60 and 65 as an example.

Explaining the Differences Between Tire Aspect Ratios

Tire aspect ratios can vary significantly, with each offering unique performance characteristics. Here’s a general overview of how different aspect ratios affect tire performance:

  • Higher Aspect Ratios (e.g., 70 or 75): Tires with higher aspect ratios typically have taller sidewalls, providing a smoother and more comfortable ride. These tires are ideal for vehicles used for long drives or cruising, as they offer better shock absorption on rough roads.
  • Moderate Aspect Ratios (e.g., 50 to 60): Tires in this range strike a balance between ride comfort and handling. They offer decent shock absorption while still maintaining a reasonable level of steering responsiveness and road feel.
  • Lower Aspect Ratios (e.g., 30 to 40): Tires with lower aspect ratios have shorter sidewalls, which generally results in improved handling and steering response. However, they tend to have a firmer ride and may be less comfortable on rough roads. These tires are often found on sports cars and high-performance vehicles.

Tire Aspect Ratio 60 vs 65

Now let’s compare two specific aspect ratios, 60 and 65, to illustrate the differences between them:

  • Tire Aspect Ratio 60: Tires with a 60 aspect ratio have sidewalls that are 60% of the section width. These tires provide a good balance between ride comfort and handling, making them suitable for a wide range of vehicles, from sedans to SUVs.
  • Tire Aspect Ratio 65: Tires with a 65 aspect ratio have slightly taller sidewalls (65% of the section width) compared to those with a 60 aspect ratio. The taller sidewalls result in a smoother and more comfortable ride, but may slightly reduce steering responsiveness and handling precision.
Aspect Ratio Illustration
Aspect Ratio Illustration

Measuring Tire Height in Inches

In this section, we’ll learn how to measure tire height (also known as overall diameter) in inches. Knowing the tire height is useful for determining if a particular tire size is suitable for your vehicle and for calculating the overall tire dimensions.

Converting Sidewall Height to Inches

First, let’s convert the sidewall height, which we previously calculated in millimeters, to inches. To do this, simply divide the sidewall height in millimeters by 25.4 (since there are 25.4 millimeters in an inch).

For example, if the sidewall height is 135 millimeters:

Sidewall Height in Inches = 135 mm ÷ 25.4 = 5.31 inches

Calculating Tire Height (Overall Tire Diameter)

Now that we have the sidewall height in inches, we can calculate the overall tire height or diameter. To do this, follow these steps:

  1. Multiply the sidewall height in inches by 2 (since there are two sidewalls, top and bottom).
  2. Add the result to the wheel diameter in inches (from the tire size marking).

For example, let’s consider a tire with a sidewall height of 5.31 inches and a wheel diameter of 16 inches:

Tire Height (Overall Tire Diameter) = (5.31 inches × 2) + 16 inches = 26.62 inches

By following these steps, you can measure the tire height in inches and better understand how a specific tire size will fit and perform on your vehicle.

Tire Diameter Calculator

Resources

Below are some links you may find helpful when learning about tires

Final Thoughts

Understanding tire dimensions, especially sidewall height, is essential to unlock the full potential of your vehicle’s performance and safety. By learning sidewall height, you’ll be better equipped to choose the perfect tire size and improve your vehicle’s driving experience.

Remember this key takeaway: tire diameter significantly influences ride comfort, handling, and aesthetics. As racing legend Mario Andretti once said, “Tires are the most critical part of the car – everything else is just a tune-up.” So, never underestimate the importance of knowing your tire specifications and making informed decisions to ensure optimal performance on the road.

Good luck and happy motoring.

About The Author

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