Pirelli Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+ Vs Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4

Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+ Vs Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4


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Time To Read:

13 minutes

 | 

Time To Read:

13 minutes

Imagine you’re at the crossroads of choosing between two highly praised all-season tires for your car: the Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+ and the Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4. Both promise to enhance your driving experience, but in different ways and under various conditions. If you’re intrigued by the idea of making an informed choice based on solid comparisons and not just marketing fluff, you’re in the right place.

The Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+ offers superior performance in light snow, making it slightly more versatile in colder climates, while the Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4 shines in wet conditions and provides a smoother, quieter ride. Both are excellent, but your preference may hinge on specific driving conditions.

In this article, we’ll dive deep into the nuances of the Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+ and Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4 tires. We’ll compare their performance in wet, dry, and winter conditions, discuss comfort and treadwear, and help you decide which tire best suits your needs.

Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+

Customer Rating

Overall Rating

8.7 of 10

Wet Weather

9.0 of 10

Winter Weather

7.5 of 10

Tread Wear

8.6 of 10

Dry Weather

9.3 of 10

Ride Comfort

8.9 of 10

UTQG

Uniform Tire Quality Grade

UTQG Treadwear Rating: 500

UTQG Traction Rating: AA

UTQG Temperature Rating: A

Mileage Warranty

5 Years / 50,000 miles

Find The Best Price

Key Performance Metrics

Hydroplaning: 9.0 of 10

Wet Grip: 9.0 of 10


Cornering: 9.3 of 10

Dry Grip: 9.3 of 10

Responsiveness: 9.2 of 10

Mild Snow Grip: 8.0 of 10

Heavy Snow Grip: 7.4 of 10

Ice Grip: 7.1 of 10


Comfort Level: 9.0 of 10

Road Noise: 8.8 of 10

Let’s dive right into the Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+, a tire that’s been turning heads in the high performance all-season category. It’s like your trusty companion for both sunny drives and those unexpected showers. Here, we’re breaking down what makes this tire tick, from its grip on wet roads to how it fares when winter decides to show up early.

Wet Performance

  • Hydroplaning Resistance & Wet Traction: Both scored a solid 9.0. This means the tire is pretty reliable in the rain, offering a stable ride without feeling like you’re ice-skating on water. It’s designed to push water aside efficiently, reducing the risk of losing control during heavy rain.

Dry Performance

  • Corner Stability, Dry Traction, & Steering Response: Each of these also bags a 9.3, except for steering response, which is a tad lower at 9.2. It suggests that the tire handles well in dry conditions, making those tight turns feel less like a gamble and more like a smooth move. The grip is commendable, ensuring your car stays glued to the road, even when you push the speed a bit.

Winter Performance

  • Light Snow Traction: Scores an 8.0, indicating it can manage light snow. However, Deep Snow Traction and Ice Traction are at 7.4 and 7.1, respectively. Translation? It’s decent in a pinch but don’t expect it to be a snowmobile. It handles light snow well enough, but deep snow and ice can be tricky.

Comfort

  • Ride Quality & Noise: Ride quality is pretty good at 9.0, with noise levels slightly lower at 8.8. It means the tire offers a comfortable ride without too much road noise creeping in, which is nice if you enjoy quiet drives without the constant hum of the road beneath.

Treadwear

  • At 8.6, it’s a bit of a mixed bag. The tire wears down at a reasonable rate, but it might not be the marathon runner of tread life. It’s durable enough for regular use but keep an eye on it as the miles pile up.

Pros

  • Excellent wet and dry performance, making it versatile for different weather conditions.
  • Good comfort levels, balancing ride quality with noise suppression for a pleasant driving experience.

Cons

  • Winter performance is just okay. It’ll get you through light snow but think twice before taking on a blizzard.
  • Treadwear could be better. It’s not a deal-breaker, but there are tires out there with a longer lifespan.

In a nutshell, the Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+ is a solid choice if you’re after a tire that can handle both sunny days and rainy nights with ease. Just remember, while it can tackle a light winter scene, it’s not your go-to for heavy snow and ice. And while its tread life is respectable, it might not be the longest-lasting tire you’ll ever buy. But for those looking for a reliable all-rounder, this tire is worth considering.

Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4

Customer Rating

Overall Rating

8.6 of 10

Wet Weather

9.1 of 10

Winter Weather

7.4 of 10

Tread Wear

8.4 of 10

Dry Weather

9.3 of 10

Ride Comfort

8.8 of 10

UTQG

Uniform Tire Quality Grade

UTQG Treadwear Rating: 540

UTQG Traction Rating: AA

UTQG Temperature Rating: A

Mileage Warranty

6 Years / 45,000 miles

Find The Best Price

Key Performance Metrics

Hydroplaning: 9.1 of 10

Wet Grip: 9.1 of 10


Cornering: 9.3 of 10

Dry Grip: 9.4 of 10

Responsiveness: 9.3 of 10

Mild Snow Grip: 8.1 of 10

Heavy Snow Grip: 7.3 of 10

Ice Grip: 6.9 of 10


Comfort Level: 8.9 of 10

Road Noise: 8.6 of 10

Next up, let’s talk about the Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4. This tire is like the multi-tool in your glove compartment – ready for whatever the road throws its way. We’re breaking it down to see how it measures up in terms of wet and dry grip, its winter capabilities, comfort, and durability.

Wet Performance

  • Hydroplaning Resistance & Wet Traction: It shines with a score of 9.1 across the board. What this means is it offers exceptional handling and confidence on wet roads. This tire is designed to cut through puddles like a hot knife through butter, keeping you in control even when Mother Nature decides to crank up the difficulty level with a downpour.

Dry Performance

  • Corner Stability, Dry Traction, & Steering Response: Here, it nudges slightly ahead with corner stability and dry traction both at 9.3 and steering response at a matching 9.3. This trio of scores tells us that the tire isn’t just good on wet roads but also offers superb handling and response when things are dry and sunny. It’s like having an extra set of hands on the wheel, helping you navigate with precision and confidence.

Winter Performance

  • Light Snow Traction: At 8.1, it performs adequately in light snow conditions. However, Deep Snow Traction and Ice Traction fall to 7.3 and 6.9, respectively. This indicates that while the tire can handle a light snowfall, it’s less reliable in more severe winter conditions. It’s a reminder that all-season doesn’t always mean all types of winter weather.

Comfort

  • Ride Quality & Noise: With ride quality at 8.9 and noise at 8.6, this tire promises a comfortable driving experience, minimizing the road’s rumbles and roars. It ensures that longer drives won’t leave you feeling like you’ve spent hours in a tin can being rattled around.

Treadwear

  • The tire scores an 8.4 in treadwear, suggesting that while it offers a good level of durability, there might be others in the market that boast a longer life. It’s durable for the average user but might require more frequent replacement for those who drive more aggressively or rack up high mileage annually.

Pros

  • Outstanding performance in both wet and dry conditions, providing excellent control and stability.
  • Comfort is a strong suit, offering a quiet and smooth ride that reduces driver fatigue on longer journeys.

Cons

  • Winter capabilities are limited. It can handle light snow but falls short in heavier winter conditions.
  • Tread life is good but not great. It stands up to daily use but might not be the marathon runner of the tire world.

To wrap it up, the Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4 is a strong contender for drivers looking for a tire that excels in wet and dry conditions, with the added bonus of a comfortable ride. However, if you’re living in an area where heavy snow and ice are common, it might leave you wanting more. And while its treadwear is decent, those seeking the longest-lasting option might need to keep looking. For those prioritizing performance and comfort, this tire is definitely worth a closer look.

High Performance All-Season Tires Should Be Able To Perform Well Enough In Light Snow To Safely Get You To Your Destination.
High Performance All-Season Tires Should Be Able To Perform Well Enough In Light Snow To Safely Get You To Your Destination.

Comparative Analysis

When it comes down to choosing between the Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+ and the Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4, it’s like deciding between two top-tier athletes who excel in slightly different events. Both tires bring their A-game to the table, but depending on what you prioritize in a tire, one may edge out the other. Let’s put them head-to-head in key categories to help you make an informed decision.

Wet and Dry Performance

Both tires perform admirably in wet and dry conditions, but with a slight twist. The Michelin has the upper hand in wet performance with a 9.1 score against the Bridgestone’s 9.0, offering that extra bit of confidence on rainy days. In dry conditions, however, they’re neck and neck, making either tire a solid choice for those sunny day drives. If you find yourself frequently driving in wet conditions, Michelin might just be the safer bet.

Winter Capability

Here’s where the distinction becomes more pronounced. The Bridgestone offers a slightly better performance in light snow with an 8.0 score, compared to Michelin’s 8.1. However, both tires struggle with deep snow and ice, a common trait for all-season tires. If winter driving is a significant concern, Bridgestone has a marginal advantage, especially in lighter snow conditions. Remember, though, for heavy winter weather, a dedicated winter tire is always the safest choice.

Comfort and Noise

Ride quality and noise levels are crucial for those long drives or daily commutes. The Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4 provides a slightly smoother and quieter ride, edging out Bridgestone by a narrow margin. If comfort is high on your list, Michelin’s subtle advantage in this area might tip the scales for you.

Treadwear and Durability

Neither tire is a clear winner in durability, with Bridgestone scoring 8.6 and Michelin slightly lower at 8.4 in treadwear. This indicates that both tires offer a good level of durability, but neither is the undisputed champion of longevity. Your driving habits and maintenance will play a significant role in how long these tires last.

Making the Choice

Choosing between these two tires boils down to what you value most:

  • For the wet-weather warrior: Michelin’s superior wet traction may offer the peace of mind you need.
  • For the winter navigator: Bridgestone’s slight edge in light snow performance could be the deciding factor.
  • For the comfort seeker: Michelin provides a slightly more comfortable and quieter ride.
  • For the all-around performer: It’s a tight race, but your specific needs and driving conditions should guide your decision.

The Verdict

In summary, both the Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+ and the Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4 are top-notch choices, each with its own set of strengths. Weighing these factors against your personal driving needs will help you select the tire that best suits your vehicle and driving style.

It’s worth noting that there are other contenders in the High Performance All-Season Tire category, like the Pirelli P Zero All Season Plus and the Continental ExtremeContact DWS 06 Plus. These tires also offer a blend of performance, comfort, and durability that merits consideration.

Hydroplaning Resistance And Wet Traction Are Critical For Safety.
Hydroplaning Resistance And Wet Traction Are Critical For Safety.

Other Competitors in the Market

While the Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+ and the Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4 often steal the spotlight in the high performance all-season tire category, they’re not the only players on the field. Let’s take a moment to shine a light on a couple of other noteworthy contenders that might just be the perfect fit for your ride.

Pirelli P Zero All Season Plus

Pirelli P Zero All Season Plus Elect
Pirelli P Zero All Season Plus Elect

First up, we have the Pirelli P Zero All Season Plus. This tire is like the dark horse of the all-season category, offering an impressive blend of performance that often rivals the big names.

  • Wet and Dry Grip: With a wet score of 9.0 and a dry score of 9.3, it’s clear this tire doesn’t mess around, whether the road is kissed by rain or basking in the sun. It promises a secure grip and responsive handling that can make even mundane drives feel a bit more thrilling.
  • Winter Performance: Scoring an 8.1 in winter conditions, it stands its ground fairly well for an all-season tire, especially in light snow. It might not be a winter specialist, but it won’t leave you stranded when the first flurries fall.
  • Comfort: This is where it really shines, with a comfort score of 9.1. The Pirelli is designed to deliver a ride that’s as smooth as it is quiet, making it a top pick for anyone who values tranquility on their travels.
  • Durability: With a treadwear score of 8.9, it suggests that this tire knows how to age gracefully, offering a lifespan that can compete with the best of them.

Vredestein Hypertrac All Season

Vredestein Hypertrac All Season
Vredestein Hypertrac All Season

Next, let’s look at the Vredestein Hypertrac All Season, a lesser-known but formidable option in the high performance all-season segment.

  • Wet and Dry Performance: It boasts a wet score of 9.0 and a dry score of 9.1. These numbers speak to its reliable performance across various conditions, ensuring a balanced drive that handles well, come rain or shine.
  • Winter Capabilities: With a winter score of 7.9, it’s a bit behind the leaders when the temperature drops. While capable in light snow, it’s not the tire you’d want for heavy winter escapades.
  • Comfort: Scoring an 8.9 in comfort, the Vredestein aims to keep your ride smooth and your cabin quiet, succeeding admirably on both fronts and proving that you don’t need to sacrifice comfort for performance.
  • Durability: The treadwear rating sits at 8.7, indicating a commendable lifespan that, while not top of the class, certainly holds its own against the competition.

Continental ExtremeContact DWS 06 Plus

Continental ExtremeContact DWS 06 Plus
Continental ExtremeContact DWS 06 Plus

Lastly, the Continental ExtremeContact DWS 06 Plus deserves a mention for its jack-of-all-trades approach to the all-season category.

  • Across-the-Board Performance: With wet and dry scores that rival the best in its class (9.1 for wet and 9.3 for dry), it offers a reliable grip that enthusiasts and daily drivers alike will appreciate. Its winter score of 7.6 shows a decent performance in lighter snow conditions, making it a versatile choice for varied climates.
  • Ride Comfort: Matching its rivals, it delivers a comfortable ride quality with a score of 8.9, ensuring that long drives remain a pleasure, not a chore.
  • Durability: The treadwear score is slightly lower at 8.5, but it still suggests a tire that will serve you well over many miles, making it a solid investment for drivers looking for a mix of performance and longevity.

Choosing Your Champion

When it comes down to it, the best tire for you isn’t just about the scores; it’s about how those scores align with your driving needs and conditions. Whether you prioritize wet grip, winter performance, comfort, or longevity, there’s a tire out there that’s the perfect match for your vehicle. The key is to weigh these factors based on your personal driving habits and the conditions you most frequently encounter.

Resources

Below are some links you may find helpful when learning about tires

Final Thoughts

Choosing the right tire between the Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+ and the Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4 comes down to prioritizing what matters most to you: superior light snow performance or exceptional wet grip and comfort.

Both tires offer a great mix of features for all-season driving, but the slight differences in their performance profiles mean that your specific driving conditions and preferences will be the deciding factor.

Good luck and happy motoring.

About The Author

Imagine you’re at the crossroads of choosing between two highly praised all-season tires for your car: the Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+ and the Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4. Both promise to enhance your driving experience, but in different ways and under various conditions. If you’re intrigued by the idea of making an informed choice based on solid comparisons and not just marketing fluff, you’re in the right place.

The Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+ offers superior performance in light snow, making it slightly more versatile in colder climates, while the Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4 shines in wet conditions and provides a smoother, quieter ride. Both are excellent, but your preference may hinge on specific driving conditions.

In this article, we’ll dive deep into the nuances of the Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+ and Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4 tires. We’ll compare their performance in wet, dry, and winter conditions, discuss comfort and treadwear, and help you decide which tire best suits your needs.

Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+

Customer Rating

Overall Rating

8.7 of 10

Wet Weather

9.0 of 10

Winter Weather

7.5 of 10

Tread Wear

8.6 of 10

Dry Weather

9.3 of 10

Ride Comfort

8.9 of 10

UTQG

Uniform Tire Quality Grade

UTQG Treadwear Rating: 500

UTQG Traction Rating: AA

UTQG Temperature Rating: A

Mileage Warranty

5 Years / 50,000 miles

Find The Best Price

Key Performance Metrics

Hydroplaning: 9.0 of 10

Wet Grip: 9.0 of 10


Cornering: 9.3 of 10

Dry Grip: 9.3 of 10

Responsiveness: 9.2 of 10

Mild Snow Grip: 8.0 of 10

Heavy Snow Grip: 7.4 of 10

Ice Grip: 7.1 of 10


Comfort Level: 9.0 of 10

Road Noise: 8.8 of 10

Let’s dive right into the Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+, a tire that’s been turning heads in the high performance all-season category. It’s like your trusty companion for both sunny drives and those unexpected showers. Here, we’re breaking down what makes this tire tick, from its grip on wet roads to how it fares when winter decides to show up early.

Wet Performance

  • Hydroplaning Resistance & Wet Traction: Both scored a solid 9.0. This means the tire is pretty reliable in the rain, offering a stable ride without feeling like you’re ice-skating on water. It’s designed to push water aside efficiently, reducing the risk of losing control during heavy rain.

Dry Performance

  • Corner Stability, Dry Traction, & Steering Response: Each of these also bags a 9.3, except for steering response, which is a tad lower at 9.2. It suggests that the tire handles well in dry conditions, making those tight turns feel less like a gamble and more like a smooth move. The grip is commendable, ensuring your car stays glued to the road, even when you push the speed a bit.

Winter Performance

  • Light Snow Traction: Scores an 8.0, indicating it can manage light snow. However, Deep Snow Traction and Ice Traction are at 7.4 and 7.1, respectively. Translation? It’s decent in a pinch but don’t expect it to be a snowmobile. It handles light snow well enough, but deep snow and ice can be tricky.

Comfort

  • Ride Quality & Noise: Ride quality is pretty good at 9.0, with noise levels slightly lower at 8.8. It means the tire offers a comfortable ride without too much road noise creeping in, which is nice if you enjoy quiet drives without the constant hum of the road beneath.

Treadwear

  • At 8.6, it’s a bit of a mixed bag. The tire wears down at a reasonable rate, but it might not be the marathon runner of tread life. It’s durable enough for regular use but keep an eye on it as the miles pile up.

Pros

  • Excellent wet and dry performance, making it versatile for different weather conditions.
  • Good comfort levels, balancing ride quality with noise suppression for a pleasant driving experience.

Cons

  • Winter performance is just okay. It’ll get you through light snow but think twice before taking on a blizzard.
  • Treadwear could be better. It’s not a deal-breaker, but there are tires out there with a longer lifespan.

In a nutshell, the Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+ is a solid choice if you’re after a tire that can handle both sunny days and rainy nights with ease. Just remember, while it can tackle a light winter scene, it’s not your go-to for heavy snow and ice. And while its tread life is respectable, it might not be the longest-lasting tire you’ll ever buy. But for those looking for a reliable all-rounder, this tire is worth considering.

Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4

Customer Rating

Overall Rating

8.6 of 10

Wet Weather

9.1 of 10

Winter Weather

7.4 of 10

Tread Wear

8.4 of 10

Dry Weather

9.3 of 10

Ride Comfort

8.8 of 10

UTQG

Uniform Tire Quality Grade

UTQG Treadwear Rating: 540

UTQG Traction Rating: AA

UTQG Temperature Rating: A

Mileage Warranty

6 Years / 45,000 miles

Find The Best Price

Key Performance Metrics

Hydroplaning: 9.1 of 10

Wet Grip: 9.1 of 10


Cornering: 9.3 of 10

Dry Grip: 9.4 of 10

Responsiveness: 9.3 of 10

Mild Snow Grip: 8.1 of 10

Heavy Snow Grip: 7.3 of 10

Ice Grip: 6.9 of 10


Comfort Level: 8.9 of 10

Road Noise: 8.6 of 10

Next up, let’s talk about the Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4. This tire is like the multi-tool in your glove compartment – ready for whatever the road throws its way. We’re breaking it down to see how it measures up in terms of wet and dry grip, its winter capabilities, comfort, and durability.

Wet Performance

  • Hydroplaning Resistance & Wet Traction: It shines with a score of 9.1 across the board. What this means is it offers exceptional handling and confidence on wet roads. This tire is designed to cut through puddles like a hot knife through butter, keeping you in control even when Mother Nature decides to crank up the difficulty level with a downpour.

Dry Performance

  • Corner Stability, Dry Traction, & Steering Response: Here, it nudges slightly ahead with corner stability and dry traction both at 9.3 and steering response at a matching 9.3. This trio of scores tells us that the tire isn’t just good on wet roads but also offers superb handling and response when things are dry and sunny. It’s like having an extra set of hands on the wheel, helping you navigate with precision and confidence.

Winter Performance

  • Light Snow Traction: At 8.1, it performs adequately in light snow conditions. However, Deep Snow Traction and Ice Traction fall to 7.3 and 6.9, respectively. This indicates that while the tire can handle a light snowfall, it’s less reliable in more severe winter conditions. It’s a reminder that all-season doesn’t always mean all types of winter weather.

Comfort

  • Ride Quality & Noise: With ride quality at 8.9 and noise at 8.6, this tire promises a comfortable driving experience, minimizing the road’s rumbles and roars. It ensures that longer drives won’t leave you feeling like you’ve spent hours in a tin can being rattled around.

Treadwear

  • The tire scores an 8.4 in treadwear, suggesting that while it offers a good level of durability, there might be others in the market that boast a longer life. It’s durable for the average user but might require more frequent replacement for those who drive more aggressively or rack up high mileage annually.

Pros

  • Outstanding performance in both wet and dry conditions, providing excellent control and stability.
  • Comfort is a strong suit, offering a quiet and smooth ride that reduces driver fatigue on longer journeys.

Cons

  • Winter capabilities are limited. It can handle light snow but falls short in heavier winter conditions.
  • Tread life is good but not great. It stands up to daily use but might not be the marathon runner of the tire world.

To wrap it up, the Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4 is a strong contender for drivers looking for a tire that excels in wet and dry conditions, with the added bonus of a comfortable ride. However, if you’re living in an area where heavy snow and ice are common, it might leave you wanting more. And while its treadwear is decent, those seeking the longest-lasting option might need to keep looking. For those prioritizing performance and comfort, this tire is definitely worth a closer look.

High Performance All-Season Tires Should Be Able To Perform Well Enough In Light Snow To Safely Get You To Your Destination.
High Performance All-Season Tires Should Be Able To Perform Well Enough In Light Snow To Safely Get You To Your Destination.

Comparative Analysis

When it comes down to choosing between the Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+ and the Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4, it’s like deciding between two top-tier athletes who excel in slightly different events. Both tires bring their A-game to the table, but depending on what you prioritize in a tire, one may edge out the other. Let’s put them head-to-head in key categories to help you make an informed decision.

Wet and Dry Performance

Both tires perform admirably in wet and dry conditions, but with a slight twist. The Michelin has the upper hand in wet performance with a 9.1 score against the Bridgestone’s 9.0, offering that extra bit of confidence on rainy days. In dry conditions, however, they’re neck and neck, making either tire a solid choice for those sunny day drives. If you find yourself frequently driving in wet conditions, Michelin might just be the safer bet.

Winter Capability

Here’s where the distinction becomes more pronounced. The Bridgestone offers a slightly better performance in light snow with an 8.0 score, compared to Michelin’s 8.1. However, both tires struggle with deep snow and ice, a common trait for all-season tires. If winter driving is a significant concern, Bridgestone has a marginal advantage, especially in lighter snow conditions. Remember, though, for heavy winter weather, a dedicated winter tire is always the safest choice.

Comfort and Noise

Ride quality and noise levels are crucial for those long drives or daily commutes. The Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4 provides a slightly smoother and quieter ride, edging out Bridgestone by a narrow margin. If comfort is high on your list, Michelin’s subtle advantage in this area might tip the scales for you.

Treadwear and Durability

Neither tire is a clear winner in durability, with Bridgestone scoring 8.6 and Michelin slightly lower at 8.4 in treadwear. This indicates that both tires offer a good level of durability, but neither is the undisputed champion of longevity. Your driving habits and maintenance will play a significant role in how long these tires last.

Making the Choice

Choosing between these two tires boils down to what you value most:

  • For the wet-weather warrior: Michelin’s superior wet traction may offer the peace of mind you need.
  • For the winter navigator: Bridgestone’s slight edge in light snow performance could be the deciding factor.
  • For the comfort seeker: Michelin provides a slightly more comfortable and quieter ride.
  • For the all-around performer: It’s a tight race, but your specific needs and driving conditions should guide your decision.

The Verdict

In summary, both the Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+ and the Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4 are top-notch choices, each with its own set of strengths. Weighing these factors against your personal driving needs will help you select the tire that best suits your vehicle and driving style.

It’s worth noting that there are other contenders in the High Performance All-Season Tire category, like the Pirelli P Zero All Season Plus and the Continental ExtremeContact DWS 06 Plus. These tires also offer a blend of performance, comfort, and durability that merits consideration.

Hydroplaning Resistance And Wet Traction Are Critical For Safety.
Hydroplaning Resistance And Wet Traction Are Critical For Safety.

Other Competitors in the Market

While the Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+ and the Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4 often steal the spotlight in the high performance all-season tire category, they’re not the only players on the field. Let’s take a moment to shine a light on a couple of other noteworthy contenders that might just be the perfect fit for your ride.

Pirelli P Zero All Season Plus

Pirelli P Zero All Season Plus Elect
Pirelli P Zero All Season Plus Elect

First up, we have the Pirelli P Zero All Season Plus. This tire is like the dark horse of the all-season category, offering an impressive blend of performance that often rivals the big names.

  • Wet and Dry Grip: With a wet score of 9.0 and a dry score of 9.3, it’s clear this tire doesn’t mess around, whether the road is kissed by rain or basking in the sun. It promises a secure grip and responsive handling that can make even mundane drives feel a bit more thrilling.
  • Winter Performance: Scoring an 8.1 in winter conditions, it stands its ground fairly well for an all-season tire, especially in light snow. It might not be a winter specialist, but it won’t leave you stranded when the first flurries fall.
  • Comfort: This is where it really shines, with a comfort score of 9.1. The Pirelli is designed to deliver a ride that’s as smooth as it is quiet, making it a top pick for anyone who values tranquility on their travels.
  • Durability: With a treadwear score of 8.9, it suggests that this tire knows how to age gracefully, offering a lifespan that can compete with the best of them.

Vredestein Hypertrac All Season

Vredestein Hypertrac All Season
Vredestein Hypertrac All Season

Next, let’s look at the Vredestein Hypertrac All Season, a lesser-known but formidable option in the high performance all-season segment.

  • Wet and Dry Performance: It boasts a wet score of 9.0 and a dry score of 9.1. These numbers speak to its reliable performance across various conditions, ensuring a balanced drive that handles well, come rain or shine.
  • Winter Capabilities: With a winter score of 7.9, it’s a bit behind the leaders when the temperature drops. While capable in light snow, it’s not the tire you’d want for heavy winter escapades.
  • Comfort: Scoring an 8.9 in comfort, the Vredestein aims to keep your ride smooth and your cabin quiet, succeeding admirably on both fronts and proving that you don’t need to sacrifice comfort for performance.
  • Durability: The treadwear rating sits at 8.7, indicating a commendable lifespan that, while not top of the class, certainly holds its own against the competition.

Continental ExtremeContact DWS 06 Plus

Continental ExtremeContact DWS 06 Plus
Continental ExtremeContact DWS 06 Plus

Lastly, the Continental ExtremeContact DWS 06 Plus deserves a mention for its jack-of-all-trades approach to the all-season category.

  • Across-the-Board Performance: With wet and dry scores that rival the best in its class (9.1 for wet and 9.3 for dry), it offers a reliable grip that enthusiasts and daily drivers alike will appreciate. Its winter score of 7.6 shows a decent performance in lighter snow conditions, making it a versatile choice for varied climates.
  • Ride Comfort: Matching its rivals, it delivers a comfortable ride quality with a score of 8.9, ensuring that long drives remain a pleasure, not a chore.
  • Durability: The treadwear score is slightly lower at 8.5, but it still suggests a tire that will serve you well over many miles, making it a solid investment for drivers looking for a mix of performance and longevity.

Choosing Your Champion

When it comes down to it, the best tire for you isn’t just about the scores; it’s about how those scores align with your driving needs and conditions. Whether you prioritize wet grip, winter performance, comfort, or longevity, there’s a tire out there that’s the perfect match for your vehicle. The key is to weigh these factors based on your personal driving habits and the conditions you most frequently encounter.

Resources

Below are some links you may find helpful when learning about tires

Final Thoughts

Choosing the right tire between the Bridgestone Potenza RE980AS+ and the Michelin Pilot Sport All Season 4 comes down to prioritizing what matters most to you: superior light snow performance or exceptional wet grip and comfort.

Both tires offer a great mix of features for all-season driving, but the slight differences in their performance profiles mean that your specific driving conditions and preferences will be the deciding factor.

Good luck and happy motoring.



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